Joe Dallesandro on aging

My interview with Joe Dallesandro here.

New Interview About Gay Life in Russia with Pavel Petel @ Nightcharm

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The inside story on gay life in Russia from one who knows, right here.

My little fairy tale, now available on Kindle.

My little fairy tale, now available on Kindle.

"Just Down From Ver-Sayce"

Check out the first picture of Gina Gershon as Donatella Versace, for House of Versace which premieres on October 5, and also stars Raquel Welch.

Gina told the New York Post: 

She goes through an evolution — she physically changes, as we all know, and it was important to be as truthful about that as possible. It’s movie magic — a little tape and glue.

One thing’s for sure - she knows how to pronounce the name of the famous fashion house, unlike some people. 

Trailer Park: Dallas Buyers Club

Oscars may rain down on Dallas Buyers Club, starring Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto, as the pre-op hooker he hooks up with when he sneaks across the border to find experimental drugs to help his advanced infection with HIV.

Trailer and more pics: 

New Site: Being HIV Negative

I have a new site, that’s a collation of articles relevant to those HIV Negative men who identify as being HIV negative and who share my belief that preventing new infections is not only essential, but actually perfectly achievable and, for that matter, quite easy.

It’s here.  

On this day (August 14) in 1975, The Rocky Horror Picture Show opened at the USA Theatre in Westwood, Los Angeles, California.
This makes it the longest-continuously running release in cinema history. And, this is the correct way to make an entrance:

On this day (August 14) in 1975, The Rocky Horror Picture Show opened at the USA Theatre in Westwood, Los Angeles, California.

This makes it the longest-continuously running release in cinema history. And, this is the correct way to make an entrance:

Simply Streisand #50

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"You’re a back stabber!" That’s what sources say Hillary Clinton accused her old love rival Barbra Streisand of being while in a fury over a salacious TV mini-series that threatens to blow the lid off her embarrassing marriage secrets.

For your convenience, the story is broken down into four readable parts: 

A Right Royal Fuck Up

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Look, I thought the lead-up marketing for The Impossible looked trite and shoddy and found it to be a solid, 3.5 star film. I had the opposite experience with both The Queen and The Iron Lady, which looked terrifically exciting but, for me, were as boring as batshit and completely lacking in insight and surprise. 

However, I’m pretty sure what to expect from Diana, due for release in October and starring (a miscast) Naomi Watts as the most famous person of my time: not a lot. The just-released poster, pictured above, has all the gravitas of a bus shelter ad for Oil of Olay, and who wrote the hopeless tagline, “The legend is never the whole story”? First of all, of course it isn’t. Legends aren’t painstaking documentary accounts. That’s what makes them legends. Secondly, the tagline has its words in the wrong order. It would read better and ring far truer to the opposite qualities of legends and whole/real stories if it was something more along the lines of: “The real story is never the legend”. Something a bit more obscure like that would also probably work to arouse greater potential audience interest. Thirdly, Diana was a legend, she was legendary, mythic — do we want to see scene after scene of her talking on the phone to a heart surgeon about whether or not they should move to New York (as the horrible trailer below foreshadows)?

But my main problem is Naomi Watt’s appearance as “Diana”. She looks nothing, really, more like any of the legions of women who based their hair and make up around Diana’s (who herself was always one to grab the latest look — remember the Harvard University hoodies?). How on Earth did they get the hair so wrong?!? Not a single facial expression or body movement rings true. Also, the voice sounds nothing like Diana’s. Most of the trailer’s paparazzi scenes show a dozen or so genial photographers and a carefree Diana, when of course in reality hundreds of media professionals hounded Diana’s every movement, and though the relationship may have had mutual benefits, it was frenetic and often hostile. And so on down the list. I mean, where’s the famous black eyeliner she wore when she observed the heart operation? It was one of her most recognizable images — but it isn’t in this movie.

But these are just the technical details — what becomes a legend most is not a film about her trying to organise her dating life. Here’s the trailer, if you dare: